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Ann Gill Taylor

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Ann Gill Taylor
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Professor Taylor has been a faculty member and clinical researcher for more than four decades at the University of Virginia. She received her baccalaureate and doctoral degrees from the University of Virginia and her master’s degree from the University of Maryland. Professor Taylor directs the Center for the Study of Complementary and Alternative Therapies, which was established in 1993 as one of the original NIH/NCCAM-funded interdisciplinary centers to stimulate research in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Research efforts in the Center focus on testing the efficacy of selected CAM modalities and contemplative practices in reducing and/or managing symptoms associated with chronic stress such as pain, anxiety, fatigue, depressed mood, and sleep disturbances to improve quality of life in a number of different patient populations. She has published widely from studies testing a number of modalities that show promise in symptom management and/or reduction. In addition to funding from the National Cancer Institute and other funding sources, Professor Taylor was the principal investigator on a CAM Research Training Program grant that received 12 years of funding that supported 18 predoctoral trainees and 19 postdoctoral fellows interested in integrative healthcare and training to conduct clinical research in the emerging field of complementary and contemplative practices; she also received funding for a 5-year academic career development award that supported her leadership in this area. Both grants were funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health. She brings skills and knowledge of rigorous clinical research planning and implementation to the Contemplative Sciences Center. Over her professional career, Professor Taylor has been recognized for excellence through a number of awards/honors, including recognition as a Living Legend of Caring by the International Association for Human Caring (2003); the Centennial Heritage Research Award (2001) on the occasion of the 200-year anniversary of the founding of the UVA School of Nursing, a Pioneer Nurses Award from the Virginia Nurses Association (2000) for outstanding research in an emerging field, Outstanding Educator Award from the American Association of Critical Care Nurses (1994); nomination for Outstanding Teacher in Virginia (1991); elected a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing in 1981; and received the University of Virginia Distinguished Professor Award in 1979. Professor Taylor remains a sought-after mentor by graduate nursing students from both the PhD Program in Nursing and the Doctorate of Nursing Practice Program who are interested in research related to complementary and contemplative practices.